McLuhan’s Global Village and Contemporary Journalism

Marshal McLuhan presented a new perception of the world as a global village in 1960.  This idea of the globalization of electronic communication is even more relevant 50 years later.  McLuhan describes it as such:

“These new media of ours have made our world into a single unit.  Everybody gets the message all the time.”

Though the types of media have changed and evolved from what was then radio and most importantly the television, the current medium of the internet and its social networking provides information and as a result global connectedness at an even faster rate.

The constant advancement of our technologies and the the ability to communicate information to each other has a profound effect on the field of journalism.  For example, there is a new capability for the average citizen to report his or her story and overcome government censorship and restraint.  A profound demonstration of this was found in the Iran elections and protests in the summer of 2009.

With the global village and the contemporary media of blogs and social networking, it is almost impossible to conceal information.  Comedian and political pundit, Bill Maher, addressed such a point in the “New Rules” section of his show, Real Time With Bill Maher. Much can be gained from a connected global society such as truth and understanding.  The proof of a global village and a connected world through media is evident.

How can the contemporary journalist make sense of this constant stream of information and present it accurately?

Rachel Clark

Advertisements

About clarkrm

print journalism major
This entry was posted in Social media, Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s