What is Web Analytics? – Alexa Deacon

Web analytics is examining internet data to understand how consumers are using website. Analytics tell us what is happening but not why it is happening. An organization can track how often its website is being visiting, how often the organization is being searched for, etc. Web analytic tools take data and create useful charts, graphs and reports. Web analytics methods are quantitative. That is, analysts strictly look at the data.

Goals are created using web analytics where an organization can use specific numbers to improve something. For example, if you want to increase then number of visits there are to your website you can set a goal of 100 more visits per month. Monitoring the analytics let’s you know three things:

          1. Where you are at?

          2. Where do you want to be?

          3. How will you get there?

While monitoring, you can make adjustments to your goals or manage expectations.

Example:

The Eau Claire Jazz Festival wanted to increase the number of Facebook likes and Google searches for Eau Claire Jazz. By doing this, we had get the word out about our Facebook page and the Festival itself. Our goal was to reach a certain number of likes by the end of February. Each week we were monitoring the analytics. When we were falling behind we created a likable Facebook status or encouraged others to spread the word on the EC Jazz Festival. By the end of February, we reach our goal. 

 

Maier, A. (2010). Complete beginners guide to web analytics and measurement. Retrieved from http://www.uxbooth.com/articles/complete-beginners-guide-to-web-analytics-and-measurement/#what

Eau Claire Jazz Festival. (2012). Retrieved from http://eauclairejazz.com/

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What role does news media have in PR strategic planning?

There is definitely a relationship between news media and PR. According to Corporate Watch, news media is a central vehicle for much of the PR industry’s message. PR practitioners tailor the message they are trying to convey and then use news media to deliver the message. News media delivers the news to the general public or the target public.
As PR needs news media, news media needs PR. News media relies on PR to fill empty air time on television and radio. Types of news media include print (newspapers and magazines), broadcast (television and radio), and the internet (blogs).
 
Example:
In the Domino’s Pizza Turn-around Campaign, Domino’s used television, radio, YouTube videos, blogging and newspapers to get the campaign message to people. Domino’s blog was only received by a small number of individuals but the TV commercials was recevied by a large number of people. News media helped the success of Domino’s.
 
 
Public relations and lobbying industry. (2003, April). Retrieved from http://www.corporatewatch.org/?lid=1572
Wilson, L. J., & Ogden , J. (2008). Strategic communications planning for effective public relations & marketing. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.
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There is defini…

There is definitely a relationship between news media and PR. According to Corporate Watch, news media is a central vehicle for much of the PR industry’s message. PR practitioners tailor the message they are trying to convey and then use news media to deliver the message. News media delivers the news to the general public or the target public.

As PR needs news media, news media needs PR. News media relies on PR to fill empty air time on television and radio. Types of news media include print (newspapers and magazines), broadcast (television and radio), and the internet (blogs).

Example:

In the Domino’s Pizza Turn-around Campaign, Domino’s used television, radio, YouTube videos, blogging and newspapers to get the campaign message to people. Domino’s blog was only received by a small number of individuals but the TV commercials was recevied by a large number of people. News media helped the success of Domino’s.

Public relations and lobbying industry. (2003, April). Retrieved from http://www.corporatewatch.org/?lid=1572

Wilson, L. J., & Ogden , J. (2008). Strategic communications planning for effective public relations & marketing. Dubuque: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company.

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How can publics be combined effectively in PR? By: Hannah Walsh

There are a several different ways that publics can be combined for effective Public Relations. There are 3 questions you should ask when trying to find the most effective way to combine publics. First, you need to see which publics working together will product the best overall solution. Second, you need to figure out which publics make the most sense for long-term organizational relationships. Last, you need to find out which combination of publics will get the desired result for the least amount of additional time, money and other resources. When combing publics, the PR person needs to find the combination that solves the problem, builds long-term relationships and is most cost effective.

 

An example of combining publics effectively is in a political campaign, when the public relations team needs to determine the best combination of voter publics that will get that person a win in the campaign.  The will need to take in consideration what combination of voter publics will give the most votes, who will be most crucial to the long term success of the candidate and what will give them the most benefit for the least amount of money.

 

Source: Strategic Communications Planning by Laurie Wilson and Joseph Ogden

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Public figures lack privacy

Arnold Schwarzenegger and Maria Shriver's marriage crumbled amid tabloid reports of an affair. (Courtesy of Google Images)

The scandals range from Arnold Schwarzenegger to Tiger Woods, but, the question remains: how much privacy do public figures deserve?

There are ranges of opinions on this issue. Bruce Cain, a director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at the University of California – Berkley, says in regards to public officials, “It’s an implied social contract – if you want to run for office, you open up your life for scrutiny.” Tom Fiedler, dean of the College of Communication at Boston University, holds a similar view.  He says that there are certain areas of public officials’ lives that journalists are not entitled to “poke around in.” However, he does say, “If the behavior of their private life is in direct contradiction to the public persona they adopt, then I do believe the journalist has a duty to expose that, because that’s the nature of public life.”

There are conflicting opinions on the privacy level that celebrities should be allowed to maintain. Pepper Shwartz, a sociologist at the University of Washington says, “Celebrities do not hold the same sort of public trust as do politicians.” Nonetheless, in the eyes of the public, celebrities are also viewed as public figures and held to the same standards as politicians. The debate continues as some people agree with Schwartz’s view that celebrities are not paid by the tax dollars of the public and do not hold the same public trust as politicians. However, some people agree with W. Keith Campbell, a psychologist from the University of Georgia, whose view is reflected in the Tiger Woods’ case, “He was a role model and seen as an upstanding, moral, put-together guy and an incredible athlete. In that sense, I think Tiger Woods did hold a public trust.”

The debate over this issue remains and will not decrease according to director Dan Schnur, of the Jesse M. Unruh Institute of Politics at the University of Southern California – Los Angeles. As long as there is a demand for scandals, there will always be news on the most private details of public figures.

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Youtube challenges traditional journalism

The way that people get their news and who delivers it may change forever because of challenges from sites like Youtube and Twitter.

The change is the result of the growth of social media and citizen journalism. The simplified definition of citizen journalism is when members of the public play an active role in collecting, reporting, analyzing, and disseminating news and information. And, the easiest way for the public to do this is through popular social media sites like Youtube, Twitter, and WordPress.  In 2008, Youtube dominated 75 percent of all videos online, wrote Limor Peer and Thomas B. Ksiazek in, “Youtube and the Challenge to Journalism”.  The article was published in Journalism Studies in 2011. The problem for traditional news is that most of their videos are being watched from sites like Youtube instead of from the news sites themselves. Peer and Ksiazek said, “We argue that changes in the marketplace are leading to the breakdown of traditional broadcast conventions, which implies new notions of what defines quality journalism.”

The biggest critics of Youtube say that citizen journalism found on such sites are not as credible as the news or traditional journalism. Andrew Tolson chose to study this and his results are found in the article, “A new authenticity? Communicative practices on Youtube”,  published in 2010 in the journal, Critical Discourse Studies. Tolson studied videos from Youtube. One example is from Lauren Luke’s video, “My  New Make-up Line.”  The issues that were noted were technical problems with the camera focus and positioning.  Those issues made the video seem less professional. The results that Tolson found from videos on Youtube made him come to the conclusion to put them in a seperate category called, “post television.” “In this form of video production, not only is there no hierarchy of discourse, but also clips of ordinary people, media people and celebrities are interlinked, in a single network,” writes Tolson.

Youtube and traditional journalism may be two separate forms of information, but who will you rely on?

The following video is more on the revolution of citizen journalism:

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Social media enhances sports experience

Today, social media has become another popular option used to enhance the sports experience for fans and journalists.

In the Internet era, fans are able to find out more information about sports faster than ever before. Social networks give fans the ability to get scores or highlights of games just seconds after the action happened. According to an article by Matt Rudnitsky of Abrams Research, a digital agency composed of social media experts, a survey of sports fans released showed that 40 percent of sports fans have become bigger fans since using social media to follow their favorite teams.

Courtesy of Google Images

Social media has also enabled fans to connect more personally with their favorite teams or players. Whether it is liking a page on Facebook or following a status on Twitter, social networking sites are where breaking sports stories first appear to fans and even sports journalists. An article by Damon Kiesow of the Poynter Institute, questioned who will break sports news and how it will affect sports journalist’s way of gathering information for a story.

With all of this instantaneous information posted on social networking sites, sports journalists and sports networks have formed specific guidelines to what is appropriate to post and when to do it. In August of 2011, ESPN updated its social media policy for its commentators, analysts, anchors, writers, and reporters to abide by. Although social media brings many advantages to sports fan, sports journalists have to adjust to some changes in workflow. Mike Cristaldi, director of public relations for the Minnesota Timberwolves, commented in this video how social media connects both fans and sports journalists together.

(Uploaded by Albert Maruggi, Courtesy of YouTube)

It is becoming clearer every day that social media is changing the way sports are reported and how teams use it to attract more fans.

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